City falls silent in Remembrance

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Remembrance Sunday 2013 in Liverpool. Pics by Laura Ryder and Gemma Sherlock

Remembrance Sunday 2013 in Liverpool. Pics by Laura Ryder and Gemma Sherlock

Bright sunshine fell across St George’s Hall as hundreds of people gathered on a cold Sunday morning to remember those who fought and died for our country.

Tears were shed and poppies were worn with pride by all who witnessed Remembrance Sunday in the city, as the Liverpool Lord Mayor Gary Millar led the proceedings and crowds gathered to fall silent to honour those who had fallen.

Dedicated Ken Jenkins, 78, who performed military duty in the National Service, has been giving out poppies every year for the past decade with support from his wife Joyce. He welcomed the crowds with poppies and emphasised how important it is to never ever forget.

This year’s service also marked the 70th commemorative year of the Battle of the Atlantic, which was the longest continuous military campaign of the Second World War and was pivotal to the overall success of the Allied Forces.

A spokesman for the Liverpool Royal British Legion told JMU Journalism: “Every aspect of this that we live for today has been earned and fought by someone else.

“We are here today to remember the sacrifices and freedom that were put before us. We must carry on and remember those who defended our shores and land. I am remembering our members, all our brothers who have battled for our freedom.”

The service began with music from The Band of The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment and Merseyside singer Danielle Louise Thomas as the parade of British servicemen and women was called to attention. Prayers were introduced by The Chair of the Liverpool District of the Methodist Church, The Reverend James Booth.

Ken Jenkins with wife Joyce has handed out poppies for 10 years. Pic by Gemma Sherlock

Ken Jenkins with wife Joyce has handed out poppies for 10 years. Pic by Gemma Sherlock

He said: “We thank you for the poppy, the red for the blood shed for us, the black for the darkness dispelled by freedom, the green for the life eternal. We thank you for the Royal British Legion for healing the wounded, for comforting the bereaved, for keeping alive the memory of all to whom we owe our lives.”

The County President of The Royal British Legion, Sir Alan Waterworth, gave The Kohima Message, before the firing of the gun which signified the two minutes’ silence at 11am.

Eleven-year-old Jack Topping, from St Edward’s College, Liverpool, sang ‘Be Still My Soul’ which then led into Prayers of Thanksgiving from The Bishop of Warrington, The Right Reverend Richard Blackburn.

The crowds stood united to sing ‘O God Our Help in Ages Past’ which was then followed by blessings from the faith leaders of the Baha’i, Buddhist, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim and Sikh religions.

The service ended with the National Anthem and a flypast of a Tiger Moth and Miles Gemini aircraft, as those present gathered to watch the parade and lay their wreaths of poppies at the Cenotaph.

Additional reporting by Laura Ryder & Georgie Moore

About Gemma Sherlock, JMU Journalism