Liverpool welcomes in Chinese New Year

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Wet weather greeted the Chinese New Year celebrations in Liverpool's Chinatown. Pic © Natalie Townsend JMU Journalism

Wet weather greeted the Chinese New Year celebrations in Liverpool’s Chinatown. Pic © Natalie Townsend / JMU Journalism

Not even the pouring rain could dampen spirits as Liverpool’s Chinatown celebrated the Chinese New Year in style on Sunday.

The ever-vibrant festivities saw hundreds gather around the wet and blustery city centre streets to watch the magnificent dragon, unicorn & lion dance parade to embrace the start of the Year of the Goat.

Families, students and locals joined the Chinese community and watched in wonder as firecrackers were let off, tai chi martial arts was demonstrated, with authentic cuisine also on offer for onlookers to sample.

Liverpudlian Stephen Knox, 58, who attends the celebration each year, told JMU Journalism: “The parade was amazing. I’ve been coming ever since I was kid. I love the people and the joy it brings to the city.”

A funfair was also available for children with various rides to add extra entertainment. Workshops and exhibitions of traditional and contemporary art were on show, offering a welcome distraction from the abysmal weather. Professionals showed their skills in calligraphy, as people marvelled at the attention to detail of the deft art.

With the many sounds of popping firecrackers, the pulsating and exquisite visuals of the parade, dancing troupes and music, it was a spectacle for all to indulge in and gain an insight to Chinese culture.

Chinese New Year celebrations in Liverpool's Chinatown. Pic © Natalie Townsend JMU Journalism

Chinese New Year celebrations in Liverpool’s Chinatown. Pic © Natalie Townsend / JMU Journalism

Despite the fact that University of Liverpool student, Yunyao Zhai, was not back in China, she was excited about the festivities in her adopted home, telling JMU Journalism: “Traditionally the New Year is a time for family. It is a 15-day celebration but the first two or three are the most important.

“Tonight, I am going to get together with friends and have lots of food and celebrate.”

It is thought that those born in the year of the goat tend to have fewer health problems in their life as they have very calm and tranquil personalities – just like goats.

Celebrations are set to continue into the night in a city with the longest-established Chinese community in Europe.

Galleries by Natalie Townsend. Click on a thumbnail to enlarge the images

Chinese New Year celebrations in Liverpool's Chinatown. Pics © Natalie Townsend JMU Journalism

Chinese New Year celebrations in Liverpool's Chinatown. Pics © Natalie Townsend JMU Journalism2

About Dan Goulding, JMU Journalism