Farewell, Liverpool – it’s been great

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Aimée Hamilton has won an internship with Index on Censorship. Photo: Ida Husøy

Aimée has won an internship with Index on Censorship. Photo: Ida Husøy

I know it’s a cliché, but it really does seem like only yesterday I was sitting in the introductory lecture for journalism out at the old Edge Lane site, extremely hung-over and barely able to keep my eyes open after my first big night out in the city.

Since then, the nights out have dwindled considerably, the tiredness became the result of overnight library sessions, and my love and appreciation for Liverpool and all it has to offer has grown exponentially.

The prospect of leaving Liverpool after graduation is upsetting; compared to the relatively small town I come from in Northern Ireland – a 45-minute drive from the nearest good shops and a £15 taxi ride to the closest night club – Liverpool was like a new world to me.

For anyone considering choosing the city as a place to study, definitely do it! It is a place with so much to offer, bars and restaurants to suit all tastes and budgets, the biggest Primark I have ever seen and some of the friendliest people you could ever wish to meet.

With regard to studying at LJMU –  I may be biased – but, I cannot imagine any other course offering as much ‘real-life’ experience as the BA (Hons) Journalism degree at John Moores does. I began my time here knowing virtually nothing about how to write a news story, design a magazine page or even conduct an interview.

Now, I leave Liverpool and JMU with my own magazine which I designed, edited and produced for my final project, an interview with Cherie Blair under my belt, and what I can only describe as a full year of workplace experience from working on both JMU Journalism and our sister paper, Liverpool Life, during my final year news days.

I am now preparing to move to London in September for nine months, having gained an internship place through the course with Index on Censorship.

I am fully aware of the vast differences between the compact city which I have grown to know as home, and the sprawling conurbation located at the opposite end of the country, where I am to begin my working life.

If I were to pick out the one thing I will miss the most about Liverpool, I would probably have to say taking a walk around Albert Dock. It was one my first visions of Liverpool across the Mersey when I arrived at Birkenhead Ferry Port three years ago and the Albert Dock remains, for me, one of the most beautiful parts of the city.

Although I am sad to say goodbye to Liverpool, I will leave with fond memories, great friends and even a mild interest in football – much to the disappointment of my rugby-fanatic dad.

I know that I will come back to Liverpool, probably quite frequently, either as a tourist or as an honorary Scouser should a job opportunity arise in the future.

So Liverpool, I’m afraid it’s farewell from me… for now at least!