‘Anonymous’ protest comes to Liverpool

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'Anonymous' protest at St Luke's Church in Liverpool. Pic by Kaltun Abdillahi © JMU Journalism

‘Anonymous’ protest at St Luke’s Church in Liverpool. Pic by Kaltun Abdillahi © JMU Journalism

Campaigners from anti-capitalist group ‘Anonymous’ descended onto the streets of Liverpool on Bonfire Night in an anti-establishment protest.

The group of more than 50 protesters began their demonstration at St Luke’s ‘Bombed-Out’ Church on 6pm last Wednesday evening to coincide with The Gunpowder Plot of 1605 on the 5th November – more widely known as Bonfire night.

Wearing Guy Fawkes masks, protesters had been gathering all around the country, including in London where clashes with police led to five people being arrested.

A former LJMU student said he was taking part because of the misrepresentation of the current system, telling JMU Journalism: “We’re not against the government we’re against corruption…we’re not trying to get rid of democracy either. We don’t need to be in a system that we have been using since the 1600s.”

Anonymous said on its website that it is against austerity, infringement of rights and mass surveillance. In a statement, the organisation added: “The standard has now been set, next year we will have bigger banners, louder voices, more fireworks, more people and a louder sound system!”

Another protester told JMU Journalism: “I’m sick of what’s going on with the government and the whole system in general. I’d like to see another system because this system is not working.”

Growing support has led to the increase in the number of people who join the demonstration each year with supporters of anti-war and pro-Palestine movements also attracted to the movement.

Another activist added: “We’re here in protest of a lot of things, cuts, corruption in the government, government using our taxes to fund illegal wars in the Middle East and other places.”

'Anonymous' protest at St Luke's Church in Liverpool. Pic by Kaltun Abdillahi © JMU Journalism

‘Anonymous’ protest at St Luke’s Church in Liverpool. Pic by Kaltun Abdillahi © JMU Journalism

Protesters in London were joined by now proclaimed revolutionary Russell Brand and those campaigning in Liverpool compared what they are trying to the aims of the comedian.

Another campaigner said the establishment is targeting the poor, telling JMU Journalism: “I know one girl, one of the kids is disabled and the kid she only feels at ease in certain places and her local libraries is one of them and that’s getting shut down.

“One, she’s going to have to go to another place but two that’s going to cost a fortune, she’s going to have to get taxis. So you’re talking about a £30 round trip to take your kid to the library and get them reading, that’s a proper attack on the poor.”

About Kaltun Abdillahi, JMU Journalism